Faux finishing: how to make your home look more elegant on a budget

PUBLISHED: 09:33 25 September 2020 | UPDATED: 09:33 25 September 2020

Polished plaster (pictured) can be used to create textured feature walls. Photo: Martin Green Traditional Decorating

Polished plaster (pictured) can be used to create textured feature walls. Photo: Martin Green Traditional Decorating

Archant

In an ideal world, we’d all like to splash out on luxurious décor for our homes. But sometimes, it’s a case of faking it until you make it.

Martin Green is a specialist in wood graining (walnut effect pictured)Martin Green is a specialist in wood graining (walnut effect pictured)

A popular decorative technique dating back to classical times, faux painting is making a comeback in 2020’s interior design trends – and it’s easy to see why. These ornate finishes offer the chance to create an array of unique surfaces and elevate the elegance of your home without breaking the bank.

“Faux finishing is the art of using decorative paintwork to create the illusion of natural materials such as wood, marble and stone,” explains Martin Green, director of Martin Green Decorating and faux painting specialist. “It’s more affordable than using expensive or hard-to-find materials and the results look just as good as the real thing.”

Here, Martin shares three popular faux finish techniques and explains how they can add decorative flair to your home.

Marbling

With its rich colour variations and luxe finish, marble has a timeless appeal that is hard to beat – but it also comes with a hefty price tag. Faux marble painting, also known as marbling or marbelising, allows homeowners to enjoy the luxurious look for less, and the variations are endless.

Marbling effect replicating black and gold Italian calacatta. Photo: Martin Green Traditional DecoratingMarbling effect replicating black and gold Italian calacatta. Photo: Martin Green Traditional Decorating

“The beauty of marbling is that you can create one-of-a-kind patterns and pops of colour with different effects,” says Martin, “whether you want the classic white and grey carrara marble for a bathroom wall or something bolder like calacatta with black and gold hues for a fireplace surround or splashback.”

Wood graining

Wood graining imitates the rich tones and intricate grains found in expensive hardwoods such as mahogany, oak and maple. This type of faux woodwork dates back centuries and is still popular today, particularly in period properties with traditional interiors.

“Feathered mahogany and oak graining effects are great for adding texture and nuance to plain timber such as pine or MDF,” says Martin. “High-end hotels and country homes often have a faux wood finish on panelled walls and doors,” he goes on to say, “but it can look just as elegant on a skirting board, cornice or railing.”

Polished plaster

For something more modern, the polished plaster faux finish is a method of wall painting that is used to create high-shine or textured surfaces. The process involves layering a filler-like substance with a trowel to replicate various materials such as Venetian plaster, limestone or concrete.

“Textured paint effects are very ‘on-trend’ at the moment, especially in contemporary homes. You can be really creative with room colours and make a statement with an accent wall,” says Martin.

To find out more about Martin Green Traditional Decorating and the services they offer, call 07957 450963 or visit martingreendecorating.co.uk.

Comments have been disabled on this article.

Latest from the Cotswold Life