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Exploring wildlife in the Cotswolds - How to tell birds' eggs apart

PUBLISHED: 01:44 23 June 2012 | UPDATED: 10:36 21 February 2013

Exploring wildlife in the Cotswolds - How to tell birds' eggs apart

Exploring wildlife in the Cotswolds - How to tell birds' eggs apart

There will be eggs a-plenty across the Cotswolds this month, both chocolate varieties and smaller ones from which a new generation of birds will soon be hatching. What to look out for when observing the nature of the Cotswolds...

Another familiar sight in our gardens is

the blackbird. These favour bushes,

creepers or trees for building their nests

from grass, rootlets and mud, into which

they lay between four and six greenishblue

and brown-speckled eggs between

March and July.

The prize for the neatest and roundest

nests must surely go to the chaffinch,

which picks bushes or the forks of trees

for its cosy constructions made from

moss, lichens, wool, feathers and hair.

Chaffinch eggs are a pink-tinged grey

with brown blotches and usually appear

during April and May.

Robins, perhaps the best loved of

British birds, seek out holes in walls, trees

or banks and even unusual spots

indoors and outdoors - for their nests,

which they build from grass, wool, moss

and hair. Their eggs, laid between

February and July, are white and

speckled with light red and usually

number five or six. Should you come

across such a nest, however, bear in

mind that blue tits and great tits lay

similarly coloured eggs and also have a

habit of finding odd places in which to

hatch their young.

Blue eggs spotted with black are more

than likely laid by the song thrush, which

makes nests from twigs, grass and moss

with a smooth lining of mud in bushes,

hedges, trees and creepers. These

tuneful birds generally lay in batches of

around four or five between February

and July.

By the summer most young

birds have flown

the nests, but its

always worth

checking hedges

carefully before

preparing to let loose

with the shears.

Another familiar sight in our gardens is the blackbird. These favour bushes, creepers or trees for building their nests from grass, rootlets and mud, into which they lay between four and six greenish-blue and brown-speckled eggs between March and July.

The prize for the neatest and roundest nests must surely go to the chaffinch, which picks bushes or the forks of trees for its cosy constructions made from moss, lichens, wool, feathers and hair. Chaffinch eggs are a pink-tinged grey with brown blotches and usually appear during April and May. Robins, perhaps the best loved of British birds, seek out holes in walls, trees or banks and even unusual spots indoors and outdoors - for their nests, which they build from grass, wool, moss and hair. Their eggs, laid between February and July, are white and speckled with light red and usually number five or six. Should you come aross such a nest, however, bear in mind that blue tits and great tits lay similarly coloured eggs and also have a habit of finding odd places in which to hatch their young. Blue eggs spotted with black are more than likely laid by the song thrush, which makes nests from twigs, grass and moss with a smooth lining of mud in bushes, hedges, trees and creepers. These tuneful birds generally lay in batches of around four or five between February and July.By the summer most young birds have flown the nests, but itsalways worth checking hedges carefully before preparing to let loose with the shears.


Gloucestershire

Wildlife Trust is a

countywide

charity which

manages 60

nature reserves

covering over 2,500 acres. Its aim is to

secure a natural environment which the

people of Gloucestershire and visitors

can enjoy for generations to come.

Local membership numbers 23,000

people and 350 regular volunteers give

their time to support the Trusts work.

Membership of the Trust costs from

just 2 a month. Join online at

www.gloucestershire widlifetrust.co.uk

tel: 01452 383333 or visit the Trusts

Conservation Centre at Robinswood

Hill Country Park, Gloucester.

Gloucestershire Wildlife Trust

...is a countywide charity which manages 60 nature reserves covering over 2,500 acres. Its aim is to secure a natural environment which the people of Gloucestershire and visitors can enjoy for generations to come .Local membership numbers 23,000 people and 350 regular volunteers give their time to support the Trusts work. Membership of the Trust costs from just 2 a month. Join online at www.gloucestershirewidlifetrust.co.uk tel: 01452 383333 or visit the Trusts Conservation Centre at Robinswood Hill Country Park, Gloucester.


ook but dont touch! Thats the key

thing to remember should you

stumble across nests in hedgerows

and trees this spring. Wild birds are

currently laying eggs in a wide range of

colours and sizes across the Cotswolds.

From high up in tall trees to concealed

spots in hedgerows, various species have

their own favourite spots for nesting.

Some, such as robins, even make use of

discarded pieces of household

equipment, such as old kettles and flower

pots, to hatch their young.

Look but dont touch!


Thats the key thing to remember should you stumble across nests in hedge rowsand trees this spring. Wild birds are currently laying eggs in a wide range of colours and sizes across the Cotswolds. From high up in tall trees to concealed spots in hedgerows, various species have their own favourite spots for nesting. Some, such as robins, even make use of discarded pieces of household equipment, such as old kettles and flower pots, to hatch their young.

Laws prohibiting the taking or even

touching birds eggs are strict: its been

illegal to remove anything from nests

since 1954 and other legislation, including

the Wildlife and Countryside Act of 1981,

makes it an offence to intentionally or

recklessly disturb a number of species

while they are nest building. Breaking

these laws could result in a fine of up to

5,000 and/or six months imprisonment.

There are times, however, when we all

come across the nests of wild birds or

the empty shells discarded after the

babies have hatched and its always

interesting to know what has laid them.

According to the British Trust for

Ornithology, wood pigeons are the most

frequently seen birds in the UK and they

make flat nests out of sticks in trees and

bushes, laying their two white eggs

between April and August.

Laws prohibiting the taking or even touching birds eggs are strict: its been illegal to remove anything from nests since 1954 and other legislation, including the Wildlife and Countryside Act of 1981 makes it an offence to intentionally or recklessly disturb a number of species while they are nest building. Breaking these laws could result in a fine of up to 5,000 and/or six months imprisonment. There are times, however, when we all come across the nests of wild birds or the empty shells discarded after the babies have hatched and its always interesting to know what has laid them. According to the British Trust for Ornithology, wood pigeons are the most frequently seen birds in the UK and they make flat nests out of sticks in trees and bushes, laying their two white eggs between April and August.

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